New Grants Available for Communities

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Humanities Access Grants

www.neh.gov

Humanities Access grants help support capacity building for humanities programs that benefit one or more of the following groups: youth, communities of color, and economically disadvantaged populations. Humanities Access grants establish or augment term endowments (that is, endowments whose funds are entirely expended over the course of a set time period) to provide funding for existing programs at institutions such as public libraries, local and regional museums, historical societies, community colleges, HBCUs and tribal colleges, Hispanic-serving institutions, archival repositories, and other cultural organizations. Humanities Access grants are intended to seed longer-term endowment-building efforts. Programs supported by Humanities Access grants might include, for example: 

  • a summer project for teens at a local historical society;
  • internships for Native American students at a tribal museum; or
  • a Clemente course at a homeless shelter organized by a community college.
  • Humanities Access Grants offer two years of match-based funding to be expended through a term endowment over the final three years of the five-year grant period. Humanities Access grant funds should not be used to replace existing program funds. Instead, the grant should expand or enhance an existing exemplary humanities program. Institutions that have never received an NEH grant and small to mid-sized institutions are especially encouraged to apply.

Adaptive Sports for Disabled Veterans

www.va.gov

The Grants for Adaptive Sports Programs for disabled Veterans and Members of the Armed Forces (ASG Program) provides grant funding to organizations to increase and expand the quantity and quality of adaptive sport activities disabled Veterans and members of the Armed Forces have to participate in physical activity within their home communities, as well as more advanced Paralympic and adaptive sport programs at the regional and national levels.

Rural Schools

www.americasfarmers.com

America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education is back again to partner with farmers to nominate their local public school district to compete for $10,000 or $25,000 to enhance math and science education. This year, the Monsanto Fund will again award a total of $2.3 million, so don’t miss out on the opportunity to keep rural schools growing where you live.

Equine Welfare

www.aspcapro.org

The ASPCA Equine Fund provides grants to U.S. nonprofit equine welfare organizations and other animal welfare organizations that care for horses, mules, donkeys, and ponies in alignment with its efforts to protect all equines. The fund awards grants to equine organizations that strive to achieve best practices both in nonprofit management and equine care. Unsolicited grants are generally awarded in amounts ranging from $500 to $5,000 and seldom exceed 10 percent of an organization's current annual operating budget. Areas of interest to the fund include 1) 1) Anti-Cruelty Seizures 2) Emergency/Disaster Support: 3) Safety Net Support (rescues, sanctuaries etc) 4) Auction Horse Euthanasia.

Storytelling

www.storynet.org

The National Storytelling Network is accepting applications for the 2016 Brimstone Award for Applied Storytelling, an annual award that recognizes the transformational properties of storytelling and the ways storytelling can promote change in individuals and communities. Grants of $5,000 will be awarded in support of model storytelling projects that are service-oriented, based in a community or organization, and are replicable (to some extent) in other places and situations. Projects should have impact beyond their own communities, organizations, or clients; inspire excellence in applied storytelling work; and communicate to new audiences the humanitarian possibilities of storytelling. Projects may involve various kinds of stories, including traditional tales and myths as well as personal and ad hoc narratives. Although oral storytelling should be central to the project, the work need not be conducted by professional storytellers. Educators, therapists, naturalists, internal or external organizational practitioners, and/or other personnel appropriate to the situation may carry out the project, so long as they can draw on suitable storytelling expertise and experience. Areas of interest include health care, environmental education/activism, community development, law, multicultural awareness, organizational development, leadership, intergenerational initiatives, empowerment of the disabled, substance abuse prevention, and educational curriculum at all levels

Tags: community projects rural development grants